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Topic Collection: IT/ Electronic Health Records

As the nature of natural and human-caused threats changes, so too does the need for robust information technology (IT) and data collection methods. Lessons learned from recent disasters have also demonstrated the need for improved electronic health record collection and maintenance and e-prescriptions are gaining in popularity. The resources in this Topic Collection include reports, toolkits, lessons learned, and guidance specific to disaster IT and electronic health records.

This ASPR TRACIE Topic Collection is in the process of being developed and comprehensively reviewed. If you have resources to recommend for inclusion in this Topic Collection, specifically illustrative examples, plans, tools or templates, please email your recommendations to askasprtracie@hhs.gov.

Topic Collection (PDF - 221 KB)

Chan, T., Killeen, J., Griswold, W., et al. (2004). Information Technology and Emergency Medical Care during Disasters. Academic Emergency Medicine. 11(11):1229-36.

The authors explain how new communications technologies and "smart devices" can potentially improve the emergency medical response to mass-casualty incidents.
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HealthIT.gov. (2014). Providers and Professionals.

Healthcare professionals can learn more about Electronic Health Records (EHR) implementation, use, incentives and certification, and getting local assistance by clicking on the links on this website.
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HealthIT.gov. (2015). A Prescription for e-Prescribers: Getting the Most Out of Electronic Prescribing.

The information on this website can help physicians and pharmacies learn more about electronic prescribing.
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HealthIT.gov. (2015). Change Management in EHR Implementation.

The materials on this website can help medical staff from critical access hospitals, rural hospitals, and large and small practices determine their level of readiness to implement EHR. Steps are listed by practice role (e.g., care coordinator, IT professional).
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Heisey-Grove, D., Chaput, D., and Daniel, J. (2015). Hospital Reporting on Meaningful Use Public Health Measures in 2014. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.

The authors share how hospitals reported data (immunizations, emergency department visits, and infectious disease laboratory results) as it related to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program. While not disaster-specific, the findings can be used to determine readiness and identify gaps in HER planning.
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Markle Foundation. (2006). Lessons from KatrinaHealth.

This report describes how KatrinaHealth, an online service developed to help Hurricane Katrina survivors, worked with healthcare providers to grant them access to evacuees’ records of medications (including dosages). The authors also share successes and challenges of the program and recommendations for the future.
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Teich, J., Wagner, M., Mackenzie, C., et al. (2002). The Informatics Response in Disaster, Terrorism, and War. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 9(2):97-104.

The authors provide an overview on three threats (bioterrorism, mass-casualty events, and the delivery of optimal health care to remote military field sites), and the associated demand for collection, analysis, coordination, and dissemination of health data.
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